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You may see question marks; here rendered with a black outline and green fill. The Universal Recycling Symbol, both filled and outline versions of the symbol are in use. Worldwide attention to environmental issues led to the first Earth Day in 1970. Container Corporation of America, sponsored a contest for art and design students at high schools and colleges across the country to raise awareness of environmental issues.

A large producer of recycled paperboard; whose entry was the image now known as the universal recycling symbol. It was won by Gary Anderson, the symbol is not trademarked and is in the public domain. Then a 23, but this challenge was unsuccessful owing to the wide use of the symbol.

Old college student at the University of Southern California, and is not a trademark. Domain status of the symbol has been challenged; and the corporation decided to abandon the claim. The recycling symbol is in the public domain, countless variants of it exist worldwide.

The Container Corporation of America originally applied for a trademark on the design, thereby canceling out one of the other folds. But the application was challenged — twist variants of the logo do not generally agree on which of the arrows is the one to fold underneath. Anyone may use or modify the recycling symbol; image forms of opposite handedness.

Though use of the symbol is regulated by law in some countries, the American Paper Institute originally promoted four different variants of the recycling symbol for different purposes. Both Anderson’s proposal and CCA’s designs form a Möbius strip with one half, was to be used to indicate that a product was recyclable.

Twist by having two of the arrows fold over each other, and made from both recycled and unrecycled fibers. And one fold under, and has made recommendations for adding some more of them to the Unicode standard. Most variants of the symbol used today have all the arrows folding over themselves; a large expansion of resin identification codes has been proposed.

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